A Look Inside the Design Team at Morningstar

A Look Inside the Design Team at Morningstar

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5 ways to switch from maker to manager—and back again

5 ways to switch from maker to manager—and back again

Then, a meeting reminder chimes, alerting you that you have a “quick chat” with someone on your team in 15 minutes. Flow ruined. Even if you could get back to work, what’s the point? The project will take at least another few hours to finish, and you’ll just have to stop again soon.

Sound familiar? You’re not alone. Designers are makers by definition, but to function in the business world, makers have to adapt to a manager’s schedule—at least part of the time.

When a design sprint isn’t the answer

When a design sprint isn’t the answer

A week is a lot of time to waste. And if you jump into a design sprint just because you heard it can solve any problem in a week, throwing away your week is exactly what you’d be doing.

Don’t get me wrong—I’m a big believer in design sprints. At Studio Science, we’ve been able to use this methodology to rapidly find solutions for ourselves and for our clients, and we’ve also been able to use elements of the sprint to inform our other, more traditional processes.

The problem comes from thinking that this shiny new methodology is a one-size-fits-all solution to any problem.